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Lower-Body Weight Training for Golf

Lower-Body Weight Training for Golf

Lower-Body Weight Training for Golf

Want longer drives off the tee? Strengthen your lower body.

2nd Swing Golf Blog writer and Long Drive pro Teddy VanRanst shares how to increase distance in his piece on lower-body weight training for golf.

Lower-Body Weight Training

You can be sure that Long Drive champ Ryan Reisbeck works on his lower-body weight training for golf. He won a recent tourney with a 422-yard drive.

As with anything, a strong foundation is key. This is especially true with hitting the golf ball. Many golfers don’t realize just how vital a strong lower body is to their game and achieving greater distance.

Enough talk, let’s get to it.

There are a few key lifts in lower-body weight training for golfers that greatly benefit trying to gain distance. The first — and best one for gaining the most strength and power — is the dead lift. When done properly, as shown in the video below, the dead lift will strengthen your legs, rear and lower back.

I usually perform this exercise in sets of five, with four to six reps in each set.

Note: Do not arch your back upward! It will break proper form and could cause injury.

Lower-Body Weight Training

The back squat is essential for increasing core and leg strength to increase distance.

The next lift that I incorporate into my routine is the back squat.

Another key workout in order to gain raw strength, this is one of the best workouts you can do, period.

As the video below shows, proper form with this lift is crucial once again.

Also, going down to roughly 90 degrees at the knees, at minimum, is recommended in order to keep a good range of motion within your joints. When I perform this lift, I try to do the same amount of sets and reps as with my dead lifts in order to keep proper balance throughout the lower half of my body.

Note: Keep your abs tight throughout the lift to stabilize your body throughout the movement.

Lower-Body Weight Training

The walking lunge is an excellent overall method of Lower-Body Weight Training for Golf.

The next workout that I try to incorporate into my lower body lifts is the walking lunge. Similar to the walking lunge stretch, except this time I do it with dumbbells in hand.

This movement is a great lower body, core, and even grip exercise. When done correctly, this lift also builds the stabilizing muscles in your ankles, knees, hips and core.

These are vital in order to have a balanced swing when swinging at higher speeds. I try to do five sets of lunges, with 10 to 20 reps per leg in each set.

Note: Start off with lighter weights, learning what your body can control. From there, slowly add weight or increase reps for more of a burn.

Lower-Body Weight Training

The box jump. Be careful on this one. It’s very tough but equally rewarding.

Last is the box jump. This is a good way to round off the lower-body workout.

No weights are needed in order to get your blood pumping and legs in shape, especially after the workouts before this. The box jump is simple. Stand next to a box, bench, or other solid platform, squat down and explode up off of the ground and land on top of the platform.

The box jump trains your muscles for a quick firing, which is exactly what a golf swing is.

A quick firing of the muscles in sequential order to propel the ball forward. I try to perform this exercise 10 times, in sets of four.

When partnered with stretching, lower-body weight training for golf will allow you to have a stronger body all around, with the added benefit of staying flexible and not becoming too tight. This is key in both preventing injuries and gaining distance with your golf game all around.

I like to do my lower-body workouts two times a week. As always, pace yourself and don’t putting hundreds of pounds on the bar to lift. Start light and build to higher weights in order to stay safe and work my way up.

Then go and hit ’em long and straight!


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